Posts Tagged ‘7 steps to living at your full potential’

Your Best Life Now: 7 Steps to Living at Your Full Potential [Hardcover]

July 19th, 2012

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Book Description
Publication Date: October 12, 2004
In this remarkable New York Times bestseller, Joel Osteen offers unique insights and encouragement that will help readers overcome every obstacle in their lives.

Editorial Reviews
Amazon.com Review
Houston televangelist Joel Osteen is well qualified to write this book, having used the seven principles he shares to achieve his own “rags-to-riches” story. At the heart of Osteen’s message is that achieving a successful, prosperous life of fulfillment can only occur when we stop worrying about the past or future to make the most of each present moment by using our God-given strengths and talents to achieve our goals. The key to doing so are the seven steps Osteen outlines: Enlarge Your Vision, Develop a Healthy Self-Image, Discover the Power of Your Thoughts and Words, Let go of the Past, Find Strength Through Adversity, Live to Give, and Choose to Be Happy. Mixing biblical teachings with his own personal experiences, Osteen explains each of these seven steps in an encouraging, optimistic manner that makes them accessible to anyone interested in principles of personal growth. Although written with a Christian slant, the seven steps Osteen shares will have value to anyone wanting to know more about practical steps of self-betterment, regardless of their denomination.–Larry Trivieri Jr.
From Publishers Weekly
Houston megachurch pastor and inspirational TV host Osteen offers an overblown and redundant self-help debut. Many Christian readers will undoubtedly be put off by the book’s shallow name-it-and-claim-it theology; although the first chapter claims that “we serve the God that created the universe,” the book as a rule suggests the reverse: it’s a treatise on how to get God to serve the demands of self-centered individuals. Osteen tells readers that God wants them to prosper, offering examples of obtaining an elegant mansion or a larger salary (“don’t ever get satisfied with where you are,” he cautions). In seven parts, he details how readers should enlarge their vision, develop self-esteem, discover the power of thought, let go of the past, find strength through adversity, give back to others and choose to be happy. The section on giving comes as too little, too late—Osteen’s message to remember others and “get your mind off yourself” flies in the face of the previous 200 pages. There are some good pockets of advice, such as letting go of past hurts and avoiding bitterness. Editorially, the book would have packed more of a punch if a third of its repetitive slogans and stories had been pruned. Theologically, its materialism and superficial portrayal of God as the granter of earthly wishes will alienate many Christian readers who can imagine a much bigger God.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Product Details
Hardcover: 310 pages
Publisher: Warner Faith (October 12, 2004)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0446532754
ISBN-13: 978-0446532754
Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1.1 x 9.3 inches

Biography
Joel Osteen is a native Texan and the Pastor of Lakewood Church, which according to Church Growth Today is America’s largest and fastest growing church with over 38,000 attendees. On July 16, 2005 after completing $95 million dollars in renovations, Joel moved Lakewood Church into its new 16,000 seat home — the former Compaq Center which is now the largest regularly-used worship center in the United States. According to Nielsen Media Research, Joel is the most watched inspirational figure in America. His weekly sermon is broadcast into television markets across the U.S. where it is viewed by seven million Americans each week and more than 20 million each month. His weekly broadcast is also seen in almost 100 nations around the world. In 2004 his first book, Your Best Life Now was released by Time Warner debuting at the top of the New York Times Bestsellers List and quickly rising to #1. It remained on the New York Times Bestseller for more than 2 years and has sold more than 4 million copies. Most recently, Joel was named as one of Barbara Walters’ “10 Most Fascinating People of 2006” and he was selected as the “Most Influential Christian in 2006” by the readers of Church Report Magazine. The son of John Osteen — a highly respected minister of the Gospel and the founder of Lakewood Church — Joel attended Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma where he studied radio and television communications. In 1982, Joel returned to Houston and founded Lakewood’s television ministry where he produced John Osteen’s televised sermons for 17 years until January 1999 when his father passed away. For many years John Osteen encouraged Joel to preach, but he always declined preferring to work behind the scenes. In early 1999, Joel felt compelled to accept his father’s invitation and he preached his first sermon on January 17th of that year. Little did anyone know that would be the last Sunday of John Osteen’s life. Two weeks later Joel began preaching and later that year was installed as the new Senior Pastor of Lakewood Church. Almost immediately, weekly attendance began to grow at an extraordinary rate and, in 2005 Joel moved Lakewood Church into its present location, the former Compaq Center, a 16,000 seat arena that was once home to the Houston Rockets professional basketball team. Now, with his wife Victoria and the leadership staff of Lakewood, this innovative church is poised for the new millennium. Joel’s extraordinary success can be found in his core message: That our God is a good God who desires to bless those who are obedient and faithful to Him through Jesus Christ. It is Joel’s deepest desire that his own life be an example of that principle and that everyone who hears this message of hope and encouragement would choose to accept God’s goodness and mercy and to become all that God wants them to be.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
58 of 67 people found the following review helpful
Don’t dismiss its simplicity October 2, 2006
By D. Wilburn
Format:Audio CDI am a lifelong Christian and have read and studied the Word from many angles and sources over the years.

I don’t know if it was just timing, or what, but I couldn’t help but notice this ‘happy preacher’ on TV. For years, I passed him by while scanning the channels, but I DID slowly begin to stop and listen- a little more each time. I was taken by Mr. Osteen’s simple messages, delivered with a humility and genuiness that I just don’t think can be faked. Anyway, I began to enjoy the half hour I spent with him on TV, but still couldn’t force myself to buy the book or even take his theology seriously for that matter – it was just ‘soul candy’ as far as I was concerned.

Finally, I gave in a little over a year ago and bought the book. I coincidentally began a new job that included a company paid daily bus pass. I began to read a chapter a day during my commute. I have now read this book at least a dozen times. Yes, it still has that candy-like comfort, but beyond that I have learned to respect the man and his theology. To those who cast it off as ‘name it and claim drivel’, I can only say that I receive a much deeper message from his words. Maybe it’s because I’ve never been a part of anything remotely like the ‘name and claim’ theology, or perhaps it’s because I’d like to believe that my own theology is deeper and therefore believe that his is too. What I’ll say is that while I have learned to appreciate how much God DOES love me and how much he wants for me, I realize that monetary wealth is just one of many types of wealth that’s being referred to in the book. And I hear the distinction loud and clear in his words. But I don’t think that’s necessarily his point. I don’t hear him PROMISING good things in this book. What I hear (and what makes the difference for me personally) is simply, – what kind of attitude are you going to have as you go through life (regardless of outcomes)? Personally, while I can’t say that his theology is totally supported in every detail by scripture, I can’t say that it contradicts it either, and it helps me immensely. Call it “Positve Thinking”. Call it what you want. It’s working for me and I can see its (positive) effect on me, my life and those I love and live with each day.

32 of 38 people found the following review helpful
Life changing June 4, 2005
By Carolyn R. Scheidies
Format:HardcoverI don’t even know where to begin on this book. There was a time I understood the principles Osteen shares. I believed them, held to them firmly, until life happened, until exhaustion and opportunities denied or lost sapped away that faith. Until I read this book, I hadn’t realized how far I’d drifted from basics I knew were true and that made a positive difference. I hadn’t realized how negative some of my attitudes had become, attitudes I began to see reflected in my adult children.

Osteen brought me back to center, to my foundation: God is good; He loves me and wants the very best for me. He also wants me to trust Him, even in when bad things happen. God desires to bless, but my negative choices and attitudes can block that blessing. No longer.

Osteen makes clear … (…)

103 of 132 people found the following review helpful
The Fine Line October 23, 2004
By Pete Smith
Format:HardcoverWhat I think many people miss about Joel Osteen’s message (as well as the spelling of his name) is the fine line between a name-it and claim-it theology and the simple message of the Bible that God loves you. If God loves you and sent His Son to die for you (the Christian Gospel), then why would He just want Christian ministers to focus on suffering and sin instead of having a postive attitude of faith and trusting God for more. “If a earthly father gives good gifts…”

I think Joel believes that Jesus is the way, the truth and the life, that there is only one way to heaven and that sin and the battle of the flesh is important, but just doesn’t focus on those things – Lord knows there are plenty of hell fire and damnation preachers out there.

Joel doesn’t say that if you claim something in Jesus name you’ll get it. Instead, he says to have faith that God will bring you through your circumstances and wants good things for you. “Faith is the substance of things hoped for…” We’ve lost the hope that we should get from God’s love. It is after all GOOD news.

Many people (and several reviewers) criticize Joel for not being overtly evangelistic to save souls or not preaching more on sin. Funny how few ministries are seeing the thousands come to the Christian faith like are coming through Joel’s church, television programs and events and even more find the encouragement to change their lives for the better. Perhaps honey does work better than vinegar?

As far as being applicable to people of other faiths or no faith at all, truth is truth. If I don’t touch the flame, I don’t get burned whether I’m a Christian or not.

In a world full of uncertainty, it is good to have a messenger who will inspire us to Live Our Best Lives Now! A nation in the war on terror needs it.