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KING.JAMES.BIBLE.400.YEAR.ANNIVERSARY.EDITION.HARDCOVER.

December 5th, 2011

KING.JAMES.BIBLE.400.YEAR.ANNIVERSARY.EDITION.HARDCOVER.

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Book Description
Series: Bible Kjv | Publication Date: October 26, 2010
Oxford is proud to announce a limited edition of the 1611 text of the King James Bible, with real leather binding, gilt edging, ribbon marker, gift presentation plate, and protective cloth slipcase.

This is the most authoritative edition of the King James Bible available. The text of the 1611 edition differs from modern editions of the King James Version in thousands of details, and this edition is the most authentic version of the original text that has ever been published. It follows the 1611 text page-for-page and line-for-line, reproducing all misprints rather than correcting them. The volume also reprints the large body of preliminary matter, which includes genealogies, maps, and lists of readings, as well as the translator’s preface to the reader. The text features an easy-to-read modern font instead of the black-letter type of the original, with the exception of the original decorative letters and early page ornaments, which have been reproduced. The volume concludes with an essay by Renaissance Studies expert, Gordon Campbell, on the first edition of the King James Bible.

The four hundredth anniversary of the publication of the King James Bible will be a major event, with celebrations held all over the world. This beautiful Anniversary Edition will make an elegant keepsake with which to remember this event as well as a marvelous gift for anyone interested in the Bible. (christian friends, anyone interested in christianity)

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Editorial Reviews
Review
Its physical splendour reflects the importance that it has had. Church of England Newspaper
About the Author
Gordon Campbell is Professor of Renaissance Studies, Department of English at the University of Leicester

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Product Details
Hardcover: 1552 pages
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA; Reprint edition (October 26, 2010)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0199557608
ISBN-13: 978-0199557608
Product Dimensions: 11.3 x 8.9 x 2.4 inches
Shipping Weight: 6 pounds

Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  18 Reviews
5 star: (16)
4 star: (1)
3 star: (1)
2 star: (0)
1 star: (0)

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 48 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a wonderful Bible!, November 9, 2010
By D. J. OROURKE

This review is from: King James Bible: 400th Anniversary Edition (Bible Kjv) (Hardcover)
I’ve had mine for about three weeks now and I am very pleased with it. It is large, and as such it’s not a carry Bible and it’s not a read in bed Bible. It is, however, a really pleasant experience reading this Bible at a desk. I happen to do a lot of my reading at my desk anyhow, so it works out great.

The layout of the text is fantastic, with lots of white space in the text, which makes it very easy reading. The line spacing is very generous as well. The references are just great; not nearly as overwhelming as, say, a 1560 Geneva or any modern reference Bible. I like the sparse references. There are lots of alternate readings provided, which I actually prefer over the cross-references. They really make reading the KJV much easier by clarifying vague or confusing verses.

WIDE MARGINS! Nowhere in the product description does it mention that is a fantastically wide margined Bible. I’ve never even seen a genuine 1611 KJV, so this kind of came as a surprise to me. But, wow, if your a note taking kind of person there is lots of open space for you to use. Basically something around 1 3/8 on the sides and just under and inch on the top and bottom. Another really nice thing is that the inside margins are big too, which means that NO text gets even close to the gutter. All the text is within a box on a flat sheet of paper no matter where you are in the Bible. Just a great presentation.

The font is not overly large considering the size of the book, but it is plenty big. Probably 9’ish sized font. The overall quality is really nice. I’m not sure that it’s a “luxury” edition exactly, but for $50 it is a super fantastic buy. The leather cover, gilding, paper and binding all seem to be of a very high quality. I have zero issues with this Bible. For the purpose that it serves I can’t recommend it enough. If you want a classic looking KJB for desktop reading, with big margins and 1611 content, buy this one… you won’t regret it.

I get goosebumps when I read this by candlelight; simply amazing. God bless and peace to all my brothers and sisters in Christ! Help other customers find the most helpful reviews
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36 of 36 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars Physical Splendour at a bargain, February 23, 2011
By Dr. Chuang Wei Ping “Dr Chuang”

This review is from: King James Bible: 400th Anniversary Edition (Bible Kjv) (Hardcover)
The chap who said “Never judge a book by its cover” probably never ended up selling a single book. I could easily have walked by this Bible in a shop, which from the outside, looked unremarkable except for its size, and concealed in a dowdy maroon cloth covered slip-cover.

Yet the Anglican Journal uses superlatives like “Physical splendour” to describe this “Quartercentenary Edition, an exact reprint in Roman Type, page for page, line for line and letter for letter of the KJV otherwise known as the Authorized Version published in the year 1611 with an anniversary Essay by Gordon Campbell.” “Quartercentenary” triggers off a spell-check alert, and it is a good thing we all understand that this does not mean 25 years.

The real burgundy leather over hard board covers has simple but solid gold stamping. It does not grab appeal. It slowly grows on you, very slowly I must add. The burgundy colour is a refreshing departure from the regular black covers. It is not a hip bible and its majesty took me some time to appreciate.

This bible is huge. The statistics of 11.3 x 9.1 x 2.4 inches and 6.3 pounds does not strike you as large until you are actually holding it. Of course, it is small in comparison to the original KJV, which is 17 inches tall, 30 pounds in weight, which may actually require two people to lift into the pulpit.

In a world of vertically longish bibles, it is rare to find one so exquisitely proportioned. The width of the bible being slightly over 0.8 times the height is the ideal W:L ratio. It is the width, which gives this bible a distinct presence. When it is open, it is a magnificent sight as a book with such a wide “wing-span” is very rare. To read this bible, the support of a table or a bed is needed. I prefer the bed.

The bible opens up flat. The margins are really wide, which adds to the aesthetics, and a great help to post-it users like me. The uncluttered layout makes the “bland” parts of the Old Testament easy to read.

For this review, I have bent the bible backwards to examine the binding “crash”, “mull” or that thingy which supports the stitching. It looked even and nicely done when viewed with a fibre-optic light. The binding – the first book part to give way and also the least visible – looks strong and the hinges of the covers likewise. Some additional effort made to secure the hinges was visible. The binding will resist the shearing forces in the hands of those more accustomed to handling small “i”-phones than very big books. I think this bible was built to last. There is nothing which says that it is acid-free, although it looks like acid-free paper is used.

The pages are glare-free even under the strongest (halogen) or uneven lighting (like from a bedside lamp). The pages are thick matt-white, and do not stick together. Every leaf feels strong and does not crinkle easily. Not much of yellow highlighter ink seeps through to the reverse page of a leaf. The Apocrypha is between the New and Old Testaments so opening the bible in the centre does not find Psalms. Amazon describes one ribbon, but my copy has two claret red ribbons, one over Esther and another over Isaiah, so they are both symmetrical around the centre. The gold paint on the gilded edges do not appear to be thick enough as the fore-edges look whitish when the bible is open.

There is quite a bit of artwork in the earlier pages of this bible. The Title Page art is impressive.
The calendar retains some of the Gothic typeface of the original 1611 KJV. There are 33 pages of illustrated Genealogy in different artistic layouts. This 400th anniversary edition is large enough to have a Map of Canaan over two opposing pages, but the details are hard to make out, since this is not the original 30 pound KJV. The artwork in the Capital Letter block in the beginning of each chapter is really interesting. There are a lot of “A”s, as in “And it came to passe…”, but it is amazing how many artistic variations there are for the capital “A” alone. There can be three different types of artwork for three separate “A”s appearing on the same spread. I estimate that there must be at least 100 different basic block artwork for the letter “A” alone, and I think I see some tiny variations in similar blocks.

The 11 ½ page essay by Gordon Campbell at the end of the text block gives a summary of the history of the KJV including how the Apocrypha got excluded. Very intriguing is Gordon Campbell pointing out that there are thousands of differences between the 1611 KJV and the present day bookshelf KJV. 1611 KJV Matthew 16:16 “thou art Christ” changed to “thou art the Christ”, “the words of Jesus” Matthew 26:75 became “the word (singular) of Jesus”.

Even a comma changed 2 Corinthians 5:2 from “for in this we grone earnestly, desiring to be clothed” to “for in this we grone, earnestly desiring to be clothed”. There were 350 “typo”s, 250 in the text and 100 in the marginal notes. Mostly inconsequential, like Gel: for Gal:, or “plaine” in Leviticus 13:56 which should read “plague”. Gordon Campbell then appends a separate 2-page list of some typos, like “brothe” for “brother” in Matthew 12. He does not go into errors in translation, and wisely too.

I note some comments about this bible being printed in China. Most of the 400th Anniversary ones are printed in China, and they are well done. I see it as a step forward. PRC will never allow politically sensitive material to be printed in China, and I sense that China is realising that persecuting Christians today is becoming a lost communist cause. I once commented that the most attentive listeners of sermons in Church are the government agents. To which a friend retorted, “Hallelujah, at least some in the secret police may still be Saved.” Likewise, at least some in the bible making industry in China may still be Saved.

Book making has long been outsourced, and it is pretty tedious work with low profit margins. Unlike some branded goods, at least the savings on bibles have been passed on to consumers. The similar sized large print Dake KJV (also very large and heavy) is printed in Korea, while the compact Dake is printed in China. As China is getting less competitive, printing is moving to Vietnam and Indonesia. Gordon Campbell was very decent in claiming only a “moral right” to his essay, rather than a copyright.

A bible of “physical splendour” at a bargain price.

2011 Thanksgiving update: I notice that the cover has changed from the dowdy maroon to a more impressive black cover with more stamped embellishments. The old Amazon illustration was just a maroon rectangular blob. They said it was going to be a limited print edition. I suppose it is the classic maroon one is limited. I would never begrudge more of this bible being printed. Apparently the demand is high. For those in the USA entitled to Free Shipping from Amazon, this can be considered a further discount. It exceeds the standard weight and international buyers incur a weight surcharge on this heavy item.

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53 of 57 people found the following review helpful:
4.0 out of 5 stars The mother of all bibles, October 24, 2010
By Wu Wei

This review is from: King James Bible: 400th Anniversary Edition (Bible Kjv) (Hardcover)
This is a large and HEAVY bible! Also, it is a 1611 KJV bible which means that it is VERY, VERY, VERY different from the ordinary King James bibles. For anyone who wants all of that, that is, anyone who wants a large, heavy 1611 King James bible will be happy with this edition.

Besides being 8.5 X 11 inches in size, this bible is over two inches thick. It has heavy, quality paper, along with a very sturdy and heavy cover, so it is HEAVY. It is uncomfortable to hold in the lap, and it cannot safely be read while opened with one hand. However, the font is large and clear enough that it can be read in bed with a tilting bed stand. Without such a stand, the only real option is to read the bible while it is laying flat on a table. If that is not acceptable, the buyer should consider smaller, lighter 1611 King James bibles instead of this one.

Like any 1611, this is very different from any KJV or modern bible. The spelling is phonetic, and very different from today’s spelling. For example, “been” is spelled “bene” and “do” is spelled as “doe”.

Also some letters are actually “switched” while printing. For example, modern “v” is often printed as “u” and modern “u” is often printed as “v”. So “unto” is spelled “vnto”, “up” as “vp”, “have” as “haue”, and “love” as “loue”. “joy” is spelled “ioy” and “Jesus” is spelled as “Iesus”.

Overall the print quality of this bible is excellent. However 3 of the last pages of the Revelation and one page of the appendix following that have a single dark bar across the bottom. This can make one line of the page harder to read. The paper quality is excellent and the print is consistent and easy to read. The edges of the pages are gilt all the way around