Posts Tagged ‘christian magazine subscriptions’

Christianity Today

April 7th, 2012

FOR MORE INFORMATION CLICK HERE: Christianity Today

Cover Price: $47.40
Price: $24.95 ($2.08/issue) & shipping is always free.

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Issues: 12 issues / 12 months

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Product Description
Magazine covering a wide range of news and editorials from a Christian perspective

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After you place your order, we will share your name, address and order information with the magazine vendor and, if we’re requested to do so, an organization that verifies publishers’ circulation records.

Product Details
Format: Magazine
Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S.
Publisher: Christianity Today Intl
ASIN: B000060MJC

This review is from: Christianity Today (Magazine)
“Christianity Today” is much like “Time Magazine.” Founded in part by Billy Graham and Carl Henry, its basis is evangelical. However, as the Christian world is farther reaching than evangelicalism, so reaches “Christianity Today.” CT remains steady and solid in its views, and helps educates the well-read Christian.

Mixing pop-news, hard-hitting issues, and intriguing features, CT manages to cover and assess the present state of Christianity. With a core of intelligent thinkers, and seasoned journalists, CT has been the leader in Christian journalism, and sets the pace for its peers.

Articles are often passed around Sunday School and CCD classes to educate the layman what is going on in the modern Christian life, helping connect the year 33 AD with 2002 AD.

Though coming from a protestant slant, Catholics and Orthodox Christians would be well-served to explore this magazine, as the movements of world Christianity are followed and reported. For example, they have done a great job reporting and analyzing the issues surrounding the Irish Catholic-Protestant conflict, separating the socio-political from the religious points of view.

A great buy. I fully recommend “Christianity Today.”

This review is from: Christianity Today (Magazine)
For a general-purpose Christian magazine, its hard to go wrong with Christianity Today. It has a little bit of everything that touches the Christian world, whether news, theology, morality, or the devotional life. Editorials and articles are well thought-out and presented in a very intellectually engaging manner. In a couple of issues that followed the 09/11 tragedy, the magazine dealt with questions that were on the minds of many: Is Islam a religion of peace? and Is the God of Mohammad the same God as the God of Jesus Christ? The articles on those questions really nailed the issue for me. Also recently there have been ongoing discussions of Openness Theology which have been helpful. The alternating columns by Philip Yancey and Chuck Colson are worth the price of the magazine. One area that could stand some expansion is the reviews section, particularly book reviews. Besides that, its hard to find fault with this magazine.

This review is from: Christianity Today (Magazine)
I have read CT for years, and appreciate its ability to report on the broad Christian world, as well as current events, from an evangelical perspective that informs believers, and offers credible material for those who want to know what we think. The blend of church news, world news, culture, and theological discussion is amazing. While covering controversies within denominations and movements, CT also helps bring the broad evangelical movement together through its explication and analysis.
Some reviewers complain that CT promotes a prosperity gospel, denominational strife, or other such unbalanced views. Such mistaken views come from reading one article, or one or two issues. Magazines sometimes write interview articles on individual thinkers, and what comes across should be seen as a report of the subject’s perspective, not an editorial endorsement by the interviewer. CT instructs the church, by allowing us to see what others are saying. It does so with crisp, concise and thoughtful style.

Bottom-line: Evangelicals will learn much about the world and themselves from this publication. Those interesting in knowing the thoughts, struggles and issues within evangelicalism will find Christianity Today a good starting place

To Order Click Here: Christianity Today