Posts Tagged ‘orthodox’

Christianity Today

April 7th, 2012

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Product Description
Magazine covering a wide range of news and editorials from a Christian perspective

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Product Details
Format: Magazine
Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S.
Publisher: Christianity Today Intl
ASIN: B000060MJC

This review is from: Christianity Today (Magazine)
“Christianity Today” is much like “Time Magazine.” Founded in part by Billy Graham and Carl Henry, its basis is evangelical. However, as the Christian world is farther reaching than evangelicalism, so reaches “Christianity Today.” CT remains steady and solid in its views, and helps educates the well-read Christian.

Mixing pop-news, hard-hitting issues, and intriguing features, CT manages to cover and assess the present state of Christianity. With a core of intelligent thinkers, and seasoned journalists, CT has been the leader in Christian journalism, and sets the pace for its peers.

Articles are often passed around Sunday School and CCD classes to educate the layman what is going on in the modern Christian life, helping connect the year 33 AD with 2002 AD.

Though coming from a protestant slant, Catholics and Orthodox Christians would be well-served to explore this magazine, as the movements of world Christianity are followed and reported. For example, they have done a great job reporting and analyzing the issues surrounding the Irish Catholic-Protestant conflict, separating the socio-political from the religious points of view.

A great buy. I fully recommend “Christianity Today.”

This review is from: Christianity Today (Magazine)
For a general-purpose Christian magazine, its hard to go wrong with Christianity Today. It has a little bit of everything that touches the Christian world, whether news, theology, morality, or the devotional life. Editorials and articles are well thought-out and presented in a very intellectually engaging manner. In a couple of issues that followed the 09/11 tragedy, the magazine dealt with questions that were on the minds of many: Is Islam a religion of peace? and Is the God of Mohammad the same God as the God of Jesus Christ? The articles on those questions really nailed the issue for me. Also recently there have been ongoing discussions of Openness Theology which have been helpful. The alternating columns by Philip Yancey and Chuck Colson are worth the price of the magazine. One area that could stand some expansion is the reviews section, particularly book reviews. Besides that, its hard to find fault with this magazine.

This review is from: Christianity Today (Magazine)
I have read CT for years, and appreciate its ability to report on the broad Christian world, as well as current events, from an evangelical perspective that informs believers, and offers credible material for those who want to know what we think. The blend of church news, world news, culture, and theological discussion is amazing. While covering controversies within denominations and movements, CT also helps bring the broad evangelical movement together through its explication and analysis.
Some reviewers complain that CT promotes a prosperity gospel, denominational strife, or other such unbalanced views. Such mistaken views come from reading one article, or one or two issues. Magazines sometimes write interview articles on individual thinkers, and what comes across should be seen as a report of the subject’s perspective, not an editorial endorsement by the interviewer. CT instructs the church, by allowing us to see what others are saying. It does so with crisp, concise and thoughtful style.

Bottom-line: Evangelicals will learn much about the world and themselves from this publication. Those interesting in knowing the thoughts, struggles and issues within evangelicalism will find Christianity Today a good starting place

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Thou Shall Prosper: Ten Commandments for Making Money [Hardcover]

March 19th, 2012

FOR MORE INFORMATION CLICK HERE: Thou Shall Prosper: Ten Commandments for Making Money

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Book Description
Publication Date: October 26, 2009
A practical approach to creating wealth-based on the established principles of ancient Jewish wisdom-made accessible to people of all backgrounds

The ups and downs of the economy prove Rabbi Daniel Lapin’s famous principle that the more things change, the more we need to depend upon the things that never change. There’s no better source for both practical and spiritual financial wisdom than the time-tested knowledge found in the ancient Jewish faith and its culture. In the Second Edition of Thou Shall Prosper, Lapin offers a practical approach to creating wealth based on the established principles of ancient Jewish wisdom. This book details the ten permanent principles that never change, the ten commandments of making money if you will, and explores the economic and philosophic vision of business that has been part of Jewish culture for centuries. The book’s focus is on making accessible to individuals of all backgrounds, the timeless truths that Jews have used for centuries to excel in business.

Outlines ten fundamental “commandments” relating to business and money
Includes insights that will increase your potential for creating wealth, no matter what your faith or background may be
Blends contemporary business stories and Lapin’s own business experiences with the wisdom of the Torah and Talmudic prescriptions
This Second Edition provides new examples, especially of Internet related business opportunities. In addition, each chapter highlights specific action steps that can lead to wealth opportunities in both difficult economic times and periods of prosperity.

Editorial Reviews
From Publishers Weekly
Combining pop psychology, snippets of Jewish lore, homespun homilies and quotations from a daunting variety of sources, Lapin offers a manual on how to make money by succeeding in business. Lapin, a super-conservative Orthodox rabbi and talk show host, insists that everyone is in business “unless you are a Supreme Court judge [sic] or a tenured university professor.” (Excluding professors fits with Lapin’s devaluation of them, since he believes that higher education doesn’t prepare for “real life.”) The material is organized into 10 chapters of advice, beginning with the notion that “business is moral, noble and worthy,” and ending with the admonition not to retire. Throughout, Lapin urges behavior that will produce more business and, thus, more money. For example, he unabashedly recommends attending synagogue or church services in order to make business contacts. Similarly, he encourages giving charity to an organization that has members who “are in the best position to advance your business objectives.” Lapin justifies these dubious actions by interpreting the fifth commandment (“Honor thy father and thy mother”) as a mandate to form relationships for business purposes. His struggle to ground his financial advice in Jewish tradition is abandoned as he expounds an anti-environmentalist stance. He digresses still further from both Judaism and wealth-building when he gives tips for public speaking based on what his father taught him (talking without a manuscript or notes and not grasping the rostrum). Lapin’s book may appeal to patient readers who share his conservative political and economic views.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review
Combining pop psychology, snippet of Jewish lore, homespun homilies and quotations from a daunting variety of sources, Lapin offers a manual on how to make money by succeeding in business. Lapin, a super conservative Orthodox rabbi and talk show host, insists that everyone is in business “unless you are a Supreme Court judge (sic) or a tenured university professor.” (Excluding professors fits with Lapin’s devaluation of them, since he believes that higher education doesn’t prepare for “real Life.”) The material is organized into 10 chapters of advice, beginning with the notion that “business is moral, noble and worthy,” and ending with the admonition not to retire. Throughout, Lapin urges behavior that will produce more business and, thus, more money. For example, he unabashedly recommends attending synagogue or church services in order to make business contacts. Similarly, he encourages giving charity to an organization that has members who “are in the best position to advance your business objectives.” Lapin justifies these dubious actions by interpreting the fifth commandment (“Honor thy father and thy mother”) as a mandate to form relationships for business purposes. His struggle to ground his financial advice in Jewish tradition is abandoned as he expounds an anti-evnironmentalist stance. He digresses still further from both Judaism and wealth-building when he gives tips for public speaking based on what his father taught him (talking without a manuscript or notes and not grasping the rostrum). Lapin’s book may appear to patient readers who share his conservative political and economic views. (Oct. 11) (Publishers Weekly, September 30, 2002) –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Product Details
Hardcover: 384 pages
Publisher: Wiley; 2 edition (October 26, 2009)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0470485884
ISBN-13: 978-0470485880
Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 1.4 inches

Biography
Rabbi Daniel Lapin is a radio talk-show host and author. He cofounded Pacific Jewish Center in Los Angeles with media personality Michael Medved and was named one of “The Top 50 Rabbis in America” by Newsweek. Rabbi Lapin is a headline speaker for hundreds of synagogues, churches, companies, and organizations. His Torah teaching programs reach over a hundred thousand followers worldwide. Rabbi Lapin lives with his family on an island near Seattle.

This review is from: Thou Shall Prosper: Ten Commandments for Making Money (Hardcover)
As a business owner in a service industry I have gained more from this book than almost any other personal finance or business management book that I have read. Unlike so many others, Rabbi Daniel Lapin does not offer any quick tricks or simple solutions. He describes a powerful process of self improvement and real change that I have found to be personally exhilarating as well as already profitable. I can see how my many financially successful Jewish friends seem to follow the rabbi’s prescriptions almost subconsciously. Now after seeing the business process through Rabbi Lapin’s eyes I find myself finding opportunity where I never saw it before. Through the practical steps that conclude each chapter I have been able to adjust my intuitive response to people and situations and this has allowed me to negotiate more effectively. The most amazing thing is how often during my first read of Thou Shall Prosper, I exclaimed “Wow! He’s right!” This stuff isn’t rocket science but it is often counterintuitive. I could have used some more diagrams and clarification of some of the more complex principles but with a few rereadings, it was fine. I recommend this book for its practical ability to make you really prosper whereas before you might just have been doing OK. He says that if you want to make different things happen to you it isn’t enough to do different things, you must actually become different. If you want to change, this book can help you do so. It is going to be my present of choice for many friends and relatives during this holiday season. You won’t regret having it in your business library.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CLICK HERE: Thou Shall Prosper: Ten Commandments for Making Money